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Australian scientists grew the first-in-the-world kidney from stem cells

In a breakthrough study following years of research, for the first time ever, Australian scientists grew kidney from stem cells. The study results have been given light in in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

The researchers were able to transform human skin cells into a tiny organ – a functioning "mini-kidney" having only a few millimeters in width. In the future, the scientists hope they will be able to increase the kidney’s size and use it both for drug testing and repairing damaged kidneys within the patient’s body. The latter, they hope, may be the future of the next 3-5 years.

To develop the kidney from human stem cells, the researchers examined which genes were turned on and off during kidney development and in a series of manipulations turned skin cells into embryonic stem cells able to self-organize and form complex kidney structures.

The research has huge potential in addressing the issue of organ transplants and developing new drugs for people suffering from kidney diseases. As human kidneys can be easily damaged during trials, developing new drugs is often cost-ineffective and time-consuming. The new study could help overcome this.

Australian scientists grew the first-in-the-world kidney from stem cells

In a breakthrough study following years of research, for the first time ever, Australian scientists from the University of Queensland's Institute for Molecular Bioscience grew kidney from stem cells. The study results have been given light in in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

The researchers were able to transform human skin cells into a tiny organ – a functioning "mini-kidney" having only a few millimeters in width. In the future, the scientists hope they will be able to increase the kidney’s size and use it both for drug testing and repairing damaged kidneys within the patient’s body. The latter, they hope, may be the future of the next 3-5 years.

To develop the kidney from human stem cells, the researchers examined which genes were turned on and off during kidney development and in a series of manipulations turned skin cells into embryonic stem cells able to self-organize and form complex kidney structures.

The research has huge potential in addressing the issue of organ transplants and developing new drugs for people suffering from kidney diseases. As human kidneys can be easily damaged during trials, developing new drugs is often cost-ineffective and time-consuming. The new study could help overcome this.


Rezultat tretmana fetalnim matičnim ćelijama zavisi od: težine bolesti, starosne dobi pacijenta, doslednosti i privrženosti medikaciji i režimu. Rezultati tretmana, prezentovani na ovom sajtu, su individualni za svaki klinički slučaj.